Sundays at KUMC

First Hour (Small Groups): 9:45 AM, Anderson House

Worship: 10:30 am, Sanctuary

What to Expect

Our 10:30 a.m. service includes a variety of hymns and songs, prayer, liturgy, scripture reading and a sermon. Our services are rich in tradition but crafted with creativity, utilizing different musical styles (from folk, to contemporary, to traditional) and innovative ways of connecting with God.

Each service typically lasts about an hour, and we celebrate Holy Communion on the first week of the month.

Immediately following the service is Coffee Hour. This is an informal time for the community to connect over a cup of coffee and a pastry, and grow deeper in relationships with each other.

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”I’ve got kids! What can they be a part of?”

Sundays are always a joyful time, but the kids at Kingston are notorious for having the most fun of all.

Nursery care for children 3 and under is available throughout the service. Kids age 4 through 3rd grade are invited to participate in Kingston Kids, an interactive time that’s designed to help them learn to love God and one another.

Nursery care (age 0-4) is provided by trained workers during service in the nursery adjacent to the fellowship hall!

 

”Okay, sounds good! What should I wear?”

Whatever makes you feel great and is true to who you are. Most of our congregation dresses pretty casually, but you’ll see the occasional high heel or bowtie, too!

 

First Hour Groups

Sundays at 9:15am

First Hour is a little like Sunday School, but with a twist. Several times throughout the year, our congregation votes on a variety of small group options, and then participate in the chosen groups in 4-8 week blocks. First Hour groups are intergenerational and interactive, and childcare is available during this time for kids 12 and under.

Recent groups:

  • Christianity and Race in America

  • An Introduction to the Enneagram

  • Methodism 101

  • A Season of Psalms

  • Capitalism and American Christianity

  • A Space for Mindfulness

  • Evangelism is Not a Dirty Word